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Bolection Fireplace

This Bolection fireplace is from the Wren period and is based on examples seen in both Hampton Court Palace and Lymore Hall, Montgomeryshire. It is carved from a fine sandstone which allows the crisp details to be achieved in the elegant mouldings.The lintel on this style of fireplace is set closely against the wall resulting in a narrow mantle shelf. It is possible to put a barrel frieze above the lintel which allows the creation of a wider moulded mantle shelf. The stone finish is not tooled resulting in a more polished appearance. The fire back is made from sandstone blocks finished with a more coarse appearance than the fire surround. The sandstone fire hearth is set flush to the oak floor and has no raised gaurd.

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Baronial Fireplace

This Baronial  fireplace is based on designs from around the fifteenth century often found in the great halls of wealthy Barons. This example is made from locally sourced Stancliffe sandstone, a coarse grain sandstone .It has two cantileverd jambs supporting a heavy moulded wide frieze lintel, which in turn supports a large stone hood made from coarsley dressed blocks of stancliffe sandstone. Each of the cantileverd jambs is made from three pieces of stone. The stone blocks in the hood are textured by dressing  with a boaster chisel and are adjusted in size to achieve the correct angle thus maintaing the structural integrity of the hood. The fire back is made from gritstone blocks with a punched chisel finish. The fire hearth is also Sandstone and has no fender. Due to the size of the flue required for this size of opening we have installed a custom made damper within the flue to reduce heat loss when the fire is not lit.

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Upper House

This fire place is taken from Upper House Kinder ,Derbyshire. It is based on a seventeenth century design. It is made from locally sourced Stancliffe stone, a medium grain sandstone ideal for holding fine detail. The stone finish has a traditionally dressed texture which has been rubbed back to produce an aged feel leaving only faint signs of the Boaster chisel marks. It has two jambs a lintel and a heavily moulded over mantle incorporating nulling within the frieze and two heavily moulded break fronts at either end. The fire back is made from the same stone and has a slightly coarser finish to emphasise the smoothness of the exterior surrounds. In this instance the hearth is incorporated into the flagg floor. This fireplace is set within a stone clad wall designed to match existing interior finishes.

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Thistlebur Hall Farm Fireplace

The Thistlebur fireplace is a modern concept of a heavily moulded fireplace. It is made from Stancliffe sandstone a medium grain sandstone sourced locally. It has it two jambs with large ornate stone stops at the bottom of the moulding each jamb is carved from a single block of stone. The lintel is one piece with a double  mould and spandrels , which are the triangular spaces between the curve of an arch and the rectangular framework. It forms a three point arch together with the jambs. On top of the lintel is a head made of two blocks also heavily moulded. On top of the blocks is a stone fire mantel with cyma recta moulding running along its edge. The overall finish is finely boastered then rubbed back to produce a fine texture.The fire back and hearth are made from the same stone. The hearth is recessed and  has a moulded fender.

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Elizabethan Fireplace

This outstanding example of an Elizabethan fireplace is based on adesign from the fifteenth century, whilst we're unsure of its heritage we paid close attention to the historical detail of the original fireplace as can be seen from the detailed images. It is made from locally sourced derbyshire gritstone which has a coarse texture. To achieve the finish the stone is punched with a Punch chisel then the mouldings and finer details are dressed in to achieve a finer finish. The three leaf detail at the bottom of the jambs was a common practice in the Elizabethan period and was intended ward off evil spirits. It represents the holy trinity and was often applied to any entrance to the house hence its location at the bottom of the flue. The hearth is flush with the floor and the fire back is heavily distressed to mimic  years of use. The example shown has no flue and is actually used with a bio ethanol gel fire.

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Plas Mawr

This fine example of a fifteenth century fireplace is very rustic and traditional in design. It's most notable feature is its candle sconces incorporated into the sides of the head. A feature copied from the fireplace at Plas Mawr, Conway. It Is made from reclaimed gritstone and must be taken from very specific size blocks to achieve the size of head required for this style of fireplace. The stone in this example was from reclaimed from the foundation stones of Turnlee mill Glossop which was destroyed in a fire. It has a very rough finish which is punched with hand tools The two jambs and head form a three point arch with spandrels. The fire back is coarse gritstone with clay mortar and is original to the building. The hearth is set above the floor level.

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Heavily Moulded Georgain Fireplace

This fireplace is a copy of one in Lygon Hall Broadway a fifteen century traditional English inn. The fireplace itself dates from the Georgain period it is heavily moulded and made from locally sourced Sandstone. The fireplace has two jambs a lintel and an over mantle. The jambs are moulded from Sandstone blocks using traditional hand tools. Once the moulded lintel is set upon the jambs this creats a three point arch effect apperture. The overmantle is then set upon the lintel. The hand carved frieze on the overmantle  is an addition not on the Lygon Hall fireplace but is a good example of our ability to adapt traditional designs. The carving technique is known as nulling. The fire back is coarsley tooled sandstone blocks and the fire hearth is carved with an integral fender.

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